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Lime Hero Spotlight: Seattle Neighborhood Greenways

Featured, Community | June 22, 2021 | Share 

In Seattle, we’re proud to partner with Seattle Neighborhood Greenways (SNG), Seattle’s leading nonprofit fighting for trails, protected bike lanes, sidewalks, crosswalks, and more. Whether you live, work, or play in Seattle, they’re making sure you’re able to get where you need to go, safely and enjoyably. 

As a grassroots network of 15 neighborhood-based, volunteer-led chapters, SNG envisions a future where Seattle's streets unite neighborhoods and connect people to where they need to go. They’re working with neighbors all across the city to make sure that Seattle’s streets are safer and more comfortable to walk, bike, and roll on for people of all ages, languages, ethnicities, genders, races, and abilities. 

Family using Lime Scooters to explore the Lake Washington Boulevard Keep Moving Street we have been advocating to keep open.

We spoke with SNG’s Executive Director Gordon Padelford about some of the exciting work they are doing in Seattle. 

Tell us about SNG’s mission: 

Seattle Neighborhood Greenways organizes and mobilizes people to make every neighborhood a great place to walk, bike, and live. This is a people-powered movement, with folks just like you, volunteering together to make a better future for all. We hope you’ll join us!

What are some of your current projects? 

We have some really exciting projects this year. Based on our advocacy, and broad community support last year, the City of Seattle introduced Stay Healthy Streetsstreets that are closed to regular thru-traffic, but open for walking, biking, skating, and morea few miles at a time until we had over 25 miles in 13 locations around the city, as well as two sister programs: Keep Moving Streets (recreation space near parks) and Stay Healthy Blocks (neighbor-run DIY Stay Healthy Streets). And they have been a HUGE hit! Communities have rallied around their local open streets, and are eager to make them permanent.

We are working with local communities to improve the existing Stay Healthy Streets and expand them to more neighborhoods. We’re also continuing our work on Cafe Streets, the permit that allows restaurants and other small businesses to use parking spaces or even entire streets to stretch out and operate successfully. This year, we’re helping local businesses make this a permanent program. We’re also pretty energized about two new initiatives: Our UngapTheMap campaign will identify the critical gaps in our current bike routes across the city and call for a complete network; and we’ll be advocating strongly for the 15-Minute Neighborhood concept, rooted  in the idea that everyone should have access to their daily needs within walking (or rolling) distance.  

What are some of the biggest challenges and opportunities for safer streets in Seattle? 

There will always be those who oppose making any changes to our streets, which is why we need people like you who care to get involved. 

What does a “People First City” mean to you? 

It means designing streets for people and what we value. We believe Seattle needs a connected network of safe & convenient streets to walk, bike, and roll onprotected from traffic and comfortable enough for people of all ages, languages, ethnicities, genders, races, and abilities. 

How can Lime riders support your work?

There’s a number of ways to get involved. Visit our website to find out about neighborhood group meetings and other ways to get involved, make a donation, or sign up for our newsletter. And of course, be sure to enroll in the Lime Hero program so that every time you take a Lime ride, you’re supporting our work!

 

About Lime Hero
Our Lime Hero program lets riders round up the cost of each ride and support a local charitable cause. Donate a slice of your Lime ride and give back!

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